The Strangest Houses: Eleven Buildings You Will not Forget

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The architecture gives us impressive buildings that excite us for its aesthetics. Constructions that defy the laws of gravity and make us stop to contemplate them. But it also gives us strange buildings and houses like the ones we bring today.

Amazing buildings that it is impossible not to look when you pass next to them by its strange forms, and that we have gathered in this post so that you can see them, and of step to comment on them.

An upside-down house in Orlando

Strangest Buildings

Image Source: Google Image

Wonderworks is a mansion built upside down and located in Orlando, Florida. Inside, you’ll expect plenty of science and nature-based attractions ** for both big and small.

A dog-shaped house in Idaho

Strangest Buildings

Image Source: Google Image

We continue in the United States, although in this case in Idaho, to know a house … let’s say different. Because its main feature this house that hosts a rural tourist accommodation is that as you can see in the picture, it has a dog shape!

A shoe-shaped house in Pennsylvania

Strangest Buildings

Image Source: Google Image

As it could not be otherwise, in a shoe-shaped building could only live a shoe seller. It was built in the late 1940s in the town of Hallam, and today, it is a major tourist attraction in this area of the United States.

The Crooked House, a crooked building in Poland

Strangest Buildings

Image Source: Google Image

This twisted building built at the beginning of the 21st century in Sopot, Poland, houses a shopping center inside. It was built by the architects Szotyński and Zaleski, who were inspired by the comics Jan Marcin Szancer and Per Dahlberg.

Offices in a giant basket in Ohio

Strangest Buildings

Image Source: Google Image

This wicker basket building in Newark, Ohio, is home to The Basket Building Company since the second half of the 1990s, and represents the basket that represents the company, though 160 times larger.

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Barrel-shaped houses in Michigan

Strangest Buildings

Image Source: Google Image

The Pickle Barrel House was built in 1927 in Grand Marais, Ohio, in the form of a barrel. And although it was built as housing, it is now a museum house in which you can see the original furniture of the 1920s.

Houses and offices with shapes of cubes, in Japan

Strangest Buildings

Image Source: Google Image

The Nakagin Capsule Tower was built in 1972 in the Japanese capital by Kisho Kurokawa, rising with a combination of cubes housing small homes and offices.

A boiler-shaped house

Strangest Buildings

Image Source: Google Image

The Kettle House, or what is the same, The Caldera House, is located in Galveston, Texas. It was built in the mid-twentieth century, and is so strong that it is able to withstand even the passing of hurricanes.

A building that dances in Prague

Strangest Buildings

Image Source: Google Image

The Dancing Building, the Dancing House of Prague, was designed by the architects Frank Gehry and Vlado Milunic in the last years of the 20th century, being a fantastic example of deconstructionism. Putting a little imagination, many people call this building Fred and Ginger, as it reminds them of a couple of dancers.

Cubic Houses, Rotterdam

Strangest Buildings

Image Source: Google Image

The Cubic Houses are a set of 32 houses designed by the architect Piet Blom in the 80’s. As a basis for design, this architect turned the conventional cube of a house 45º, placing it on pillars with hexagonal shape.

Books for a library

Strangest Buildings

Image Source: Google Image

We return to the United States, a country that lavishes itself in different constructions, to know the public library of Kansas City. There, the facade of the outdoor parking of this library is conformed by the covers of different books, alluding to what the citizens can find inside the building.

Written by Alex

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